Dating oil lamps

Dating oil lamps

Skip to main content. Log In Sign Up. A Typological and Compositional Analysis. Keira De Rosa. A typological examination is used to place each lamp into relevant provincial groups and chronological periods, accompanied with archaeological drawings.

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Increasing numbers of new glass kerosene lamps have been coming on the market. This includes everything from small finger-lamps to multicolored banquet lamps. New lamps continue to be made overseas as well as here in America. The new kerosene lamps are generally quite good quality. Like any other mass produced items, however, pattern detail and overall quality vary from piece to piece.

One of the catalogs from a new lamp wholesaler claims its lamps "were made using the original antique lamps as models. The easiest first test to catch new glass lamps is to simply expose them to black light. The vast majority of all new glass lamp fonts and bases are glued together. Vintage glass kerosene lamps were fused together when the glass was hot. All the pressed glass lamps we purchased for this article, which came from several sources, were glued. Even knowing what to look for, it is difficult to detect the glue in ordinary light with the naked eye.

But every new joint fluoresces brightly in black light Fig. Old joints that are fused, not glued, do not fluoresce at the base-font joint. Pure acetone has no effect on the modern glue. Neither does any one of several other solvents and paint removers. The new lamps were finally were separated after boiling them in water for about 5 minutes. The boiling water test is mentioned purely to prove that the lamps are indeed glued.

This procedure should be considered hazardous and is not recommended as a test for new and old. Another clue to age is the metal hardware. This includes the metal fitting collar into which the burner screws; metal filling holes through which fuel is poured; and metal font-to-base connections. With rare exceptions, all old metal hardware is mounted or joined to the glass with plaster. By contrast, almost all new metal hardware is glued. This glue also fluoresces brightly under long wave black light.

Another clue to new metal hardware is wide or empty spaces between the metal and the glass. There are no empty spaces in old joints; the entire joint is packed with plaster Figs. Don't be fooled by elaborate new hardware such as you might find in larger lamps like the new Cathedral lamp in Fig. The hardware joining the base and font looks complicated but it is just another form of a glued joint. A metal plate is glued to the bottom of the font. A bolt passes through this plate on into the glass base where it is fastened with a nut.

Old glass fonts intended to be used with metal connectors generally have fairly long glass pegs Fig. Packing plaster around the peg held the old font in the old metal connector. New fonts designed to be glued into new metal connectors or glued to a glass base, have only a slightly raised bump Fig. The long bolts generally used in new hardware are threaded their entire length Fig.

Nearly all the old bolts are packed in plaster so they don't move. Most new bolts are loose within the metal plate Fig. All but two pieces of new metal hardware on these lamps were brass plated, so it's tempting to say all the new hardware is plated. But that isn't true. Connections on the new Cathedral lamp are solid brass. What the hardware is made of isn't as important as how it's fastened to the glass. Keep in mind, however, that old hardware can be put on new lamps.

They might even be put on with plaster. Many of the new lamps are being produced in colors and color combinations not originally made. A list of new pressed glass kerosene lamps including colors and sizes appears at the end of this article. If an original was only made in clear, any colored examples would obviously be highly suspect. Dissolve the glue and the lamp comes apart. The light colored band is glue.

Under black light, some glue showed green-yellow but most was blue-white. These larger pegs were packed in plaster under a metal connector to join old fonts to old bases. Fig 9. New bolts, left, connecting new hardware are threaded the entire length. Original nuts are square, new are hexagonal. Of course restored and repaired old lamps may have new hardware. Fig Bolts in new hardware, left, are loose; this bolt is tilting because it has no support.

Old metal connections, right, are packed in plaster on glass pegs. The old bolts are set solid in the plaster and do not move. The new Sweetheart or Beaded Heart lamp in Fig. The Sweetheart lamp is available in many colors. The base and font of the new lamps in Figs. The Cathedral lamp is sold in combinations of blue and amber. In old lamps, plaster was used to secure the metal collar; the new collar is glued. The bolt in the new metal connector is fully threaded; old bolts were threaded only on the end.

Reproduction Aladdin Lincoln Drape lamps. Both types— the tall and short versions—are reproduced. Both styles of new lamps are glued at the base and font. New Button and Swirl lamp, left, is 8". New finger lamp in Petal and Rib pattern, right. Collars in both new lamps are glued. The new Princess Feather lamp is made in both tall and short versions shown here is the short. New Coolidge Drape lamp. New lamp called Daisy Heart by the wholesaler. So far we have not been able to find an old example.

It is currently offered in clear and pink but may have been made in additional colors. All these new lamps are glued together at the base and font. Confirm Close. Kerosene Glass Lamps - Separating New from Old Increasing numbers of new glass kerosene lamps have been coming on the market. Font-to-Base Joints The easiest first test to catch new glass lamps is to simply expose them to black light. Hardware Another clue to age is the metal hardware.

Ogee's Antiques. David Lesurf Antiques and Art. Coyote Moon Antiques. Eron Johnson Antiques. DejaVu a Deux. Prairieland Antiques. Quirky Antiques. Hodge Podge Lodge - 1. Hoosier Collectibles. Best Kept Secrets. Glass Lovers Gallery. Frans Finds. JG Gallery. Stephen A. Kramer Ltd. Copperton Lane Antiques and Collectibles. Chris's Watches and Antiques.

Finer Choice. Lake Girl Vintage. Old Fancy Glass and Collectibles. Mary's Menagerie.

The best way to get an exact date of manufacture is by having an appraiser view the lamp. You can also educate yourself on oil lamps that resemble yours to. Apr 27, It's easy to confuse antique styled oil lamps with genuine antique oil lamps. There are several things to keep an eye out, such as specific style.

An oil lamp is an object used to produce light continuously for a period of time using an oil-based fuel source. The use of oil lamps began thousands of years ago and continues to this day, although not commonly anymore. Oil lamps are a form of lighting , and were used as an alternative to candles before the use of electric lights.

The holy lands.

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Aladdin The Magic Name in Lamps by J.W. Courter

These items are not for sale and the descriptions, images and prices are for reference purposes only. You can reduce the number of items displayed by entering a keyword that must be included in the description of the item. Two antique oil lamps with glass fonts and shades, plus an original extra ruby acid etched shade, 19th century, the taller 62 cm high Show 38 more like this. An antique brass kerosene lamp , a World War I artillery shell and a Middle Eastern hooker pipe incomplete , the lamp 55 cm high Show 1 more like this. A small French porcelain oil lamp, late 19th century, brass neck marked boulle and Paris, a cylindrical porcelain font with indigo transferware decoration of a bird, amongst bramble berries on a white ground, set within brass mounts and having, a globular Show 17 more like this.

vintage oil lamp

There is nothing quite like a genuine antique oil lamp or a beautiful antique desk lamp to add that feeling of opulence and comfort to your favourite room. The style of antique lamps varies and here you will discover fine examples of Arts and Crafts, Art Nouveau and Victorian gothic lamps. As well as styles there are different types, including beautiful cranberry glass oil lamps, sophisticated desk lamps and even the odd gasolier or electrolier. Whatever style or type of lamp you choose, you will really come to appreciate the particularly warm light that your antique lamps and matching lamp shades provide. Particularly if the lamp consists of parts that are in themselves collectable, like original cranberry glass shades or oil holders for instance. When you purchase an antique oil lamp or any antique lamp as a long term investment, it really is essential that you find out if the lamp is in working order. How is your lamp constructed? Check if the lamp is made of silver, brass or bronze? The more precious the material, the more it will be worth. Verify the lamps age.

A lamp is a device that holds and burns fuel, typically oil, as a means of producing light.

After human race first tamed the fire and started to use it as a light source, a need appeared for a smaller, controllable flame - a more sophisticated solution, if you will. First such solution was an oil lamp some Early humans used shells, hollow rocks or any nonflammable material as a container and in it some moss soaked in animal fat which they would ignite and it would burn with a flame. As the industry developed so did the materials of which the oil lamps were made as well the fuel.

Kerosene Glass Lamps - Separating New from Old

Aladdin lamps were unique in the use of a round wick to provide an even non flickering flame, and a rare earth mantle that glowed to produce the light of a 60 watt light bulb when heated by the flame from the kerosene lamp. The difference between the light of the Aladdin lamps and any other oil or kerosene lamp was so great that the company offered a one thousand dollar reward to any person who could show them an oil lamp that could equal its light. The reward was never collected, and by the early 's seven million Aladdins had been sold! Aladdin was also one of the pioneers in modern sales techniques and would allow customers to trade in their old oil lamps on new Aladdin lamps. They were also one of the first companies to use radio as an advertising medium in the Midwest. Included in the program was a cash offer of twenty five dollars for the best ten word slogan submitted. The response was letters and of those didn't even submit a slogan--they just wanted more information on the lamp! As radio grew so did Aladdin's coverage until it covered the nation. Aladdin lamps were manufactured in a wide variety of styles. The first were made of metal, either brass or nickel plated brass. There were several models of the metal lamps including table lamps, bracket lamps, and some very unusual hanging lamps. The 's and 40's saw lamps made of colored glass, and included the now much sought after ruby crystal and cobalt blue, tall Lincoln drape Aladdin lamps.

History of Oil Lamps

I can date them, not by the technology alone, but by the style. In addition, the delicate expressions, demure and chaste, are a clue to how the late Victorians thought of female vulnerability. This indicates that certain objects had a gender. And these lamps signify this interesting design quirk of the time. Men had their own designs and styles for rooms most often containing men, like the smoking room, the billiards room, and the library. The idea of gendered objects — if you think about it — makes no sense, but it is such a part of our past cultural heritage that we do not often think about it. These ideas about gender and appropriate objects are still with us.

Victorian Oil Lamps

Increasing numbers of new glass kerosene lamps have been coming on the market. This includes everything from small finger-lamps to multicolored banquet lamps. New lamps continue to be made overseas as well as here in America. The new kerosene lamps are generally quite good quality. Like any other mass produced items, however, pattern detail and overall quality vary from piece to piece. One of the catalogs from a new lamp wholesaler claims its lamps "were made using the original antique lamps as models.

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Get Your Old Oil Lamps Working!
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